Fly By the Seat of Your Pants

Plotters plot and pansters fly by the seat of their pants. I have done both in many genres of writing, including both fiction and nonfiction, and let me tell you–I will never be a pantser. 

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The Cafe is Not the Office

When writing is your passion and not your job, maybe it’s still fun and cool to cuddle up in an oversized plush couch and watch the world out a rainy window, but when you’re trying to run a business and meet deadlines and manage several manuscripts at once, writing at a cafe is tantamount to doing surgery on a rollercoaster.

Step One: Learn Everything

I used to think I could research my books as I went. I used to delve into plot and character development and setting and think ‘I’ll get to that later’. I used to believe that research was secondary to the fundamentals of writing a story.

I used to be very, very wrong.

Setting Reading and Writing Resolutions

And now we’re onto 2019! I’m excited to read, write and do more in the new year and I want to approach my reading and writing goals with optimism and realism. Here are a few trips to making author and reader resolutions you may actually hit.

The Writing Process – There’s No Road Map

Every writer has their own style and approach to a story. Some research first, others outline and plan, and some dive right in with nothing more than a name and a vague idea for where their novel might end up. As you can probably guess, I’m not one of those people.

11 Tips for Getting Over Fiction Writer’s Block

While there are a great many similarities between the tips for fiction and nonfiction writers block, I would say there are a great many differences too. Writing fiction employs a variety of skills that don’t necessarily overlap with those utilized for journalism or nonfiction. That does not mean it is easier or harder, simply different.

11 Tips for Getting Over Nonfiction Writer’s Block

Writer’s block was no longer a good enough reason not to write, but that didn’t mean I was suddenly cured of it. The deeper I got into writing, the more resources I found for managing my muses, so to speak. It wasn’t that I suddenly, magically, never got writer’s block again. I just knew the importance of finding ways to overcome that challenge.

Place as Character

Cities do not speak. Beaches do not dance. Mountain ranges do not dream. Places are not, intrinsically, human. The humanity we derive from them is based in our own perception, the sights, sounds and smells that form a location or environment in our mind.
There is no natural anthropomorphism to a place, and that is why it is so important that we put it there.

Diving Deep: The Deep POV Question

The goal, ultimately, is to make your reader feel as though they are no longer reading, but rather, fully immersed in the story.

There are several ways to go about doing this. Here are just a few.

Villains – Make Them Good or Make Them Gone

These characters are the lens through which a tale is told, and who they are–and how well the author knows them– directly influences that story. You’d be hard pressed to find a writer who didn’t understand the importance of heroes and heroines.

The same can’t always be said of the villains, however.