11 Tips for Getting Over Fiction Writer’s Block

While there are a great many similarities between the tips for fiction and nonfiction writers block, I would say there are a great many differences too. Writing fiction employs a variety of skills that don’t necessarily overlap with those utilized for journalism or nonfiction. That does not mean it is easier or harder, simply different.

Continue reading 11 Tips for Getting Over Fiction Writer’s Block

11 Tips for Getting Over Nonfiction Writer’s Block

Writer’s block was no longer a good enough reason not to write, but that didn’t mean I was suddenly cured of it. The deeper I got into writing, the more resources I found for managing my muses, so to speak. It wasn’t that I suddenly, magically, never got writer’s block again. I just knew the importance of finding ways to overcome that challenge. Continue reading 11 Tips for Getting Over Nonfiction Writer’s Block

Place as Character

Cities do not speak. Beaches do not dance. Mountain ranges do not dream. Places are not, intrinsically, human. The humanity we derive from them is based in our own perception, the sights, sounds and smells that form a location or environment in our mind.
There is no natural anthropomorphism to a place, and that is why it is so important that we put it there. Continue reading Place as Character

Villains – Make Them Good or Make Them Gone

These characters are the lens through which a tale is told, and who they are–and how well the author knows them– directly influences that story. You’d be hard pressed to find a writer who didn’t understand the importance of heroes and heroines.

The same can’t always be said of the villains, however.  Continue reading Villains – Make Them Good or Make Them Gone

Two is Company, Six is Ensemble Writing

When writing a large cast, you have to know your characters really well. More importantly than that, however, you have to know how they interact with one another. Here are two exercises you, as an author, can do to ensure your characters are rounded and fully-developed before they ever hit the pages of your book. Continue reading Two is Company, Six is Ensemble Writing